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Topic-icon Do you feel that you have received enough education in your graduate program on trachs and ventilators?

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31 Mar 2011 22:59 - 06 Feb 2013 13:50 #18 by admin.speechteam
admin.speechteam created the topic: Do you feel that you have received enough education in your graduate program on
This answer was written by Karlene Stefanakos, M.A. CCC-SLP:

The simple answer is NO. Usually these skills are specialties of SLPs who have the chance in their careers to work in a hospital that specializes in these types of patients.

Kate Micheal
Website Administrator
www.speechteam.com
Last Edit: 06 Feb 2013 13:50 by admin.speechteam. Reason: adding author
The following user(s) said Thank You: Susan Brouse

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10 May 2013 14:47 #137 by Susan Brouse
Susan Brouse replied the topic: Re: Do you feel that you have received enough education in your graduate program
I absolutely do not feel that I had enough...and I am surprised by how many people go in thinking 'i've got this' when they leave school and begin practicing. It takes a lot of initiative to realize our strengths and weaknesses and to ask for help/ guidance/ further education in areas we need it. There is no shame in saying 'I don't know.' you do need to take it upon yourself to get educated though beyond what you're provided in grad school in areas you are weaker.

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10 May 2013 16:20 #138 by Karlene
Karlene replied the topic: Re: Do you feel that you have received enough education in your graduate program
Susan, Very well put. But, also, the focus of our attention also needs to be upon ASHA, our curriculum accreditation agency for the nation. For example, engineering is a professional field that has split itself into many new and innovative fields, i.e., biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering,. civil engineering, industrial engineering, computer engineering, aeronautical engineering, nuclear engineering, materials engineering, etc. Each "new engineering" field is developed with a full curriculum specifically dedicated to state-of-the-art competency in the new field. Then, when you look at Speech Language Pathology, over a thirty year period, our leaders can't even split two curriculum pathways between "Public School" (pediatric) speech language pathology and "Medical" speech Language Pathology (Adult). As ASHA continues to widen our responsibilities via position papers, and/or policy statements, there is no followup with appropriate nationally standardized curriculums, so the graduate is not left in legal jeopardy upon graduation, which is now the case. Healthcare is being scrutinized more and more each day. Black and white letter law ( another area we are not trained in) requires that we stage dementia cases CMS Transmittal 46, 1981), and are able to ascertain a definitive etiological based diagnosis of a patient's dysphagia (Hospital Manual,Transmittal 597, 1990). Neither of these course areas have been standardized across the nation by ASHA. Being an "autonomous" profession, which is the same legal status as a physician, means that we are responsible for an etiological based, NOT a symptom listing, evaluation. The SLP is required by law to understand the organic basis/deficit that leads to the symptom observed. This is serious business that involves the life of a patient. And, we are failing the patient with compensatory strategies that never seem to be habituated, and volitional oral motor exercises which can never fix a reflex mechanism called the swallow. Serious and extensive curriculum correction is needed at the university, and this responsibility is ASHA's.
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